Keep Transport Moving

Two issues facing London are of particular significance as the capital heads toward 'megacity' status. The first is the acute undersupply of housing. The second is the need for sustained investment in London's transport system, in order to service London's rapidly increasing population.[1] Research undertaken by ComRes on behalf of LCCI in May 2015 found that housing was the top infrastructure priority for London.[2] In meeting London's housing need it is essential that the role that transport infrastructure can play to unlock housing development is recognised.

The new Mayor of London should:

Drive forward network enhancements including Night Tube commencement, Bakerloo Line extension and move Crossrail 2 to 'next stage' 

Driving forward network enhancements, including Night Tube commencement, Bakerloo Line extension and moving Crossrail 2 to 'next stage' will help enable the new Mayor to address both the city's chronic housing shortage and the need to expand capacity on the transport network as London's population surges towards nine million by 2020. LCCI strongly supports the development and construction of Crossrail 2, which represents a strategic investment in London's future infrastructure needs and demonstrates the role that transport infrastructure can play to unlock underdeveloped areas for housing by improving transport links. The successful delivery of Crossrail 2 would support delivery of over 200,000 new homes as well as help address London's transport 'capacity crunch'; a crunch that will see Crossrail '1', now christened the Elizabeth Line, full the day it opens.

Boost airport capacity by seeking best use of existing infrastructure through airfield, terminals and rail-link enhancements in the London airports system

Airports in London and the South East face significant airport capacity constraints. Heathrow is already full and both Gatwick and Stanstead are expected to reach capacity by the mid-2020s. LCCI believes that the next Mayor should boost airport capacity by seeking best use of existing infrastructure through airfield, terminals and rail-link enhancements in the London airports system. Improving existing infrastructure would encourage more use of airports which currently have spare capacity, improve the passenger experience, and ensure that London and the South East remains attractive to business. Demand for flights in the UK is forecast to double by 2050. It is therefore vital that these measures be implemented quickly in order to maximise the capital's airport capacity in the short term.

Examine the cost of commuter transport and explore use of smart ticketing to incentivise travel outside peak hour period

Both Londoners and businesses believe that transport costs are a major barrier to London's competitiveness, making fare increases unpalatable.[3] Examining the cost of commuter transport and exploring the use of smart ticketing to incentivise travel outside peak hours could help tackle the capital's high levels of congestion and help support low paid workers.

Work with business to deliver an effective future road freight strategy and review the commercial impacts of the proposed Ultra Low Emission Zone

The freight industry underpins the London economy. Without a constant supply of goods and services the capital would cease to operate 24 hours a day. LCCI believes that the new Mayor should work with business to deliver an effective future road freight strategy, and review the commercial impacts of the proposed Ultra Low Emission Zone.

[1] It is expected that the population will grow to 10 million by 2030 (https://tfl.gov.uk/info-for/media/press-releases/2015/june/-tfl-annual-report-published)

[2] ComRes survey of 1,016 members of the London public, 156 London councilors and 510 London business decision makers for London Tomorrow London's future infrastructure: Who pays and how do we deliver? May 2015

[3] 39% of Londoners, 41% of business leaders and 34% of councillors see London transport costs as one of the main barriers to London being competitive with other major UK and global cities. (ComRes survey for London Tomorrow of 150 London councillors; 514 business leaders and 1,005 London adults, September 2015)

Keep Transport Moving

Two issues facing London are of particular significance as the capital heads toward 'megacity' status. The first is the acute undersupply of housing. The second is the need for sustained investment in London's transport system, in order to service London's rapidly increasing population.[1] Research undertaken by ComRes on behalf of LCCI in May 2015 found that housing was the top infrastructure priority for London.[2] In meeting London's housing need it is essential that the role that transport infrastructure can play to unlock housing development is recognised.

The new Mayor of London should:

  • Drive forward network enhancements including Night Tube commencement, Bakerloo Line extension and move Crossrail 2 to 'next stage' 
  • Driving forward network enhancements, including Night Tube commencement, Bakerloo Line extension and moving Crossrail 2 to 'next stage' will help enable the new Mayor to address both the city's chronic housing shortage and the need to expand capacity on the transport network as London's population surges towards nine million by 2020. LCCI strongly supports the development and construction of Crossrail 2, which represents a strategic investment in London's future infrastructure needs and demonstrates the role that transport infrastructure can play to unlock underdeveloped areas for housing by improving transport links. The successful delivery of Crossrail 2 would support delivery of over 200,000 new homes as well as help address London's transport 'capacity crunch'; a crunch that will see Crossrail '1', now christened the Elizabeth Line, full the day it opens.
  • Boost airport capacity by seeking best use of existing infrastructure through airfield, terminals and rail-link enhancements in the London airports system
  • Airports in London and the South East face significant airport capacity constraints. Heathrow is already full and both Gatwick and Stanstead are expected to reach capacity by the mid-2020s. LCCI believes that the next Mayor should boost airport capacity by seeking best use of existing infrastructure through airfield, terminals and rail-link enhancements in the London airports system. Improving existing infrastructure would encourage more use of airports which currently have spare capacity, improve the passenger experience, and ensure that London and the South East remains attractive to business. Demand for flights in the UK is forecast to double by 2050. It is therefore vital that these measures be implemented quickly in order to maximise the capital's airport capacity in the short term.
  • Examine the cost of commuter transport and explore use of smart ticketing to incentivise travel outside peak hour period
  • Both Londoners and businesses believe that transport costs are a major barrier to London's competitiveness, making fare increases unpalatable.[3] Examining the cost of commuter transport and exploring the use of smart ticketing to incentivise travel outside peak hours could help tackle the capital's high levels of congestion and help support low paid workers.
  • Work with business to deliver an effective future road freight strategy and review the commercial impacts of the proposed Ultra Low Emission Zone
  • The freight industry underpins the London economy. Without a constant supply of goods and services the capital would cease to operate 24 hours a day. LCCI believes that the new Mayor should work with business to deliver an effective future road freight strategy, and review the commercial impacts of the proposed Ultra Low Emission Zone.

[1] It is expected that the population will grow to 10 million by 2030 (https://tfl.gov.uk/info-for/media/press-releases/2015/june/-tfl-annual-report-published)

[2] ComRes survey of 1,016 members of the London public, 156 London councilors and 510 London business decision makers for London Tomorrow London's future infrastructure: Who pays and how do we deliver? May 2015

[3] 39% of Londoners, 41% of business leaders and 34% of councillors see London transport costs as one of the main barriers to London being competitive with other major UK and global cities. (ComRes survey for London Tomorrow of 150 London councillors; 514 business leaders and 1,005 London adults, September 2015)

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